Menu

Property Tax Resources

Sep
01

Texas Legislature Retains Equal and Uniform Property Tax Remedy

Tax relief was a hot topic from the very beginning of the session, with lawmakers submitting bills in both the House and the Senate proposing property tax, sales tax and franchise tax relief.

The 84th Texas legislative session followed a pre-session spectacle that seemed to promise heated debates over property tax issues, but ended with no casualties or otherwise drastic changes to the state’s property tax remedies and system.

Legislators submitted some 332 property tax bills. Among those were several bills addressing grumblings raised in the news media as to the equal-and-uniform remedy, unique to Texas and instrumental in granting its taxpayers property tax relief. The remedy holds that a property’s appraised value must be equal to or less than the median appraised value of a reasonable number of comparable properties appropriately adjusted.

In the end, the legislature passed about 65 bills, granting tax relief to property owners, making tweaks to the property tax system and leaving the equal-and-uniform remedy intact.

Tax relief was a hot topic from the very beginning of the session, with lawmakers submitting bills in both the House and the Senate proposing property tax, sales tax and franchise tax relief. Eventually, the legislature increased the homestead exemption for school district property taxes from $15,000 to $25,000, effective for the 2015 tax year. In addition, the legislature reduced franchise taxes by 25 percent.

In another effort to grant property tax relief, the law will now require a taxing entity to achieve a 60 percent majority vote, rather than a simple majority, to adopt a property tax rate that exceeds the effective tax rate. The effective rate is the tax rate that would achieve the same amount of revenue as the previous year’s taxes. Additionally, the interest rate taxing entities must pay on refunds resulting from the final determination of a taxpayer’s property value increased to 9.5 percent until the refund is made.

As expected, the equal-and-uniform tax relief provision garnered considerable discussion. In recent years, countless articles and interviews criticizing commercial property owner’s “abuse” of the equal-and-uniform remedy circulated in the industry. Although the Constitution guarantees equal and uniform taxation, opponents alleged the remedy had shifted the property tax burden from commercial property owners to homeowners.

On the reverse side, commercial property owners advocated fair and equitable treatment in a district’s valuation of their property, and wanted a right to pursue their equal and uniform remedy through litigation, just like homeowners do.

The equal-and-uniform remedy for commercial property owners was at risk going into the session, and a few lawmakers introduced a handful of bills that would have substantially limited or completely eliminated the remedy for commercial property owners. Those bills failed to gain momentum, however, and none passed out of committee.

Instead, to address both appraisal district and taxpayer concerns over the perceived misuse and the general preservation of the equal and uniform remedy, lawmakers eventually passed a compromise bill. House Bill 2083 amending the tax code provides that any equal-and-uniform analysis must be based on the application of generally accepted appraisal methods and techniques.

At the same time, it recognizes a property owner’s right to give an opinion as to the value of his own property. While increasing the standard under which an equity analysis must be prepared and reviewed, the new law leaves the equal-and-uniform remedy in place for all taxpayers.

Several other measures adopted during the legislative session seek to secure taxpayer access to relief. The legislature expanded the availability of arbitration as an alternate means to appeal property values, for example.

Now, commercial property owners with a property appraised at $3 million or less may appeal directly through binding arbitration instead of having to file an appeal in district court. This replaces the previous $1 million threshold, making the remedy available to more commercial property owners.

Another new law aims to facilitate the process for lawsuit settlement by requiring parties to attend settlement conferences before incurring unnecessary expenses. And lawmakers passed other laws directed at addressing taxpayer concerns over exemptions, applications and other procedures.

A legislative session is sometimes more notable for the measures that failed to pass. At least one failed bill proposed to allow appraisal districts to recover their attorneys’ fees should they prevail in district court, as taxpayers are currently allowed. Another would have provided for a 5 percent appraisal cap on all property, disregarding studies suggesting that caps are ineffective tax relief measures that run contrary to equal-and-uniform taxation. Neither these nor some of the more curious bills received much attention.

Ultimately, despite warnings of the looming collapse of the equal-and-uniform remedy, the bills that passed were uncontroversial. The equal-and-uniform remedy for commercial property owners remains secure, and other passed amendments will generally benefit property owners.

MelissaRamirez150Melissa Ramirez is a principal with the Austin law firm of Popp Hutcheson P.L.L.C., which focuses its practice on property tax disputes and is the Texas member of American Property Tax Counsel (APTC), the national affiliation of property tax attorneys. Ms. Ramierz can be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Continue reading
Nov
30

Eagle Ford Shale Ignites Boom

"Natural gas reserves a boom for not just energy industry, but for all of South Texas."

South Texas is humming with activity, much of it attributable to the Eagle Ford Shale and the rapid growth it has brought to the region. The opportunities available and the boom resulting from the Eagle Ford resources have generated significant wealth and economic activity in these modest communities. As the population expands with workers and South Texas hastens to keep up with the surging demand for housing, roads and other infrastructure, property values are on the rise.

The boom has fueled significant tax assessment increases over the past few years. South Texas counties are reaping the benefits of the new prosperity by increasing property values and adding more property to their tax base. The trend serves as a poignant example of how externalities affect value.

What is the Shale?
The Eagle Ford Shale is a geological formation from the Cretaceous period spanning the Mexican border in South Texas into East Texas. It is roughly 50 miles wide, 400 miles long, and pans 30 Texas counties between the Buda Lime and Austin Chalk formations. The shale produces dry gas, wet gas, natural gas liquids and oil.

Some experts believe the Eagle Ford discovery could become the sixth largest oil discovery in the history of the United States. Combine this with the fact that it is as large as or larger than the Barnett Shale play in terms of natural gas reserves, and you have a recipe for a legendary oil and natural gas boom.

Since 2008, the exponential growth in the Eagle Ford Shale has been staggering. In 2008, there were roughly 350 barrels of oil produced in the region per day; today, almost 10 times more barrels of oil are produced per day. And, as of the end of September, an estimated 5,200 drilling permits have been issued.

Benefits to South Texas
In South Texas, housing supply has increased as numbers of transient workers migrate to work in the oil fields, on pipeline projects and in new gas processing plants. From 2000 to 2010, the population in just a six-county region (Dimmit, Frio, La Salle, Maverick, Webb and Zavala) grew by roughly 66,000 people, and housing grew by about 22,000 units.

The results from the new prosperity are evident in the increase in property tax assessment values. For La Salle County's Cotulla Independent School District (15D), total taxable value was over $2.3 billion in 2012, compared to $408 million in 2008. Nearby, the Dilley ISD total taxable value more than doubled to $235 million in 2012, from $103 million in 2008. While the majority of the increase in tax base is due to the value of oil, gas and minerals and the industrial personal property needed for these projects, the ripple effects can also be observed in commercial and residential properties.

For example, lodging room revenues in the oil and gas areas grew by almost 16 percent in 2012, which is more than the state average, according to a report prepared by Source Strategies Inc. for the Office of the Governor, Economic Development & Tourism. Also, room revenues in the city of Alice (Jim Wells County) were $12 million in 2012 compared to $5 million in 2008.
As room revenues increase, appraisal districts have captured the new income streams and raised hotel values.

This is just one example of how the activity from the Eagle Ford boom has filtered down to property values. But while room revenues have been consistently increasing over the last
couple of years, Source Strategies suggests that the growth seems likely to moderate, as revenues during the second quarter 2013 declined slightly in Victoria and Laredo.

Similarly, as the market begins to even out and supply catches up with demand, there may be more stabilization of property values. In any event, property owners should be watchful of market trends in reviewing their property values.

Continued Growth Ahead
Anticipated future production in the Eagle Ford Shale indicates continued expansion in South Texas. By 2021, the Eagle Ford Shale could produce as much as $62.2 billion in output and $34 billion in gross regional products, according to projections by the University of Texas at San Antonio's Institute for Economic Development. More permits continue to be

approved for drilling.

As communities in South Texas catch up with the increased activity, property owners should be on guard against unfair and inflated property tax assessments.

MelissaRamirez150Melissa Ramirez is a principal with the Austin law firm of Popp Hutcheson P.L.L.C., which focuses its practice on property tax disputes and is the Texas member of American Property Tax Counsel (APTC), the national affiliation of property tax attorneys. Ms. Ramierz can be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Continue reading

American Property Tax Counsel

Recent Published Property Tax Articles

Use Restrictions Can Actually Lower A Tax Bill

​Savvy commercial owners are employing use restrictions as a means to reduce taxable property values.

Most property managers and owners can easily speak about their property's most productive use, in addition to speculating on a list of potential uses. Not all of them, however, are as keenly aware of their property's...

Read more

Nothing New About The Old ‘Dark Store Theory’

Statutory law continues to require that assessors value only the real estate, not the success or lack thereof, by the owner of the real estate.

Assessors and their minions frequently take the position that an occupied store is more valuable than an unoccupied store, a conclusion commonly referred to as the...

Read more

Benjamin Blair: Creative Deal Structures Can Yield Tax Benefits

​Managing expenses is one of the best ways to ensure the long-term profitability of investment properties, and prudent developers know the importance of carefully monitoring and challenging property tax assessments. But student housing, as a subsector populated largely by tax-exempt educational institutions, presents unique opportunities to minimize taxes for some...

Read more

Member Spotlight

Members

Forgot your password? / Forgot your username?