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Jan
04

24th Annual Property Tax Seminar - Scottsdale, Arizona

Event Information

The APTC is proud to announce that Scottsdale, Arizona will be the site of the 24th APTC Annual Property Tax Seminar.

Seminar Title: "Coming Attractions: Positioning Yourself in a Changing Real Estate Market"
October 24 - 26, 2018 - Hyatt Regency Scottsdale Resort and Spa at Gainey Ranch - Scottsdale, Arizona

APTC seminars provide an exclusive forum where invited guests can collaborate with nationally known presenters and experienced property tax attorneys to develop strategies to successfully reduce and manage property taxes. See the Featured Speakers appearing at the 2018 Seminar.

This year's seminar will address recent developments and current trends in the areas of property taxation and real estate. We will bring together nationally-known economic, technological, appraisal, and legal experts to provide valuable insight on how to navigate the quickly-changing and often turbulent real estate market

Linda Terrill, President


Featured Speakers

KC Conway, MAI, CRE
K.C. Conway is Director of Research & Corp Engagement at University of AL, Culverhouse College of Commerce - ACRE (AL Ctr. for R.E.). He has 30 years commercial real estate experience (25 private industry; 5 within Federal Reserve system 2005-2010). He has been Chief Appraiser, Env. Risk Manager and Sr. Market Intelligence Officer SunTrust Bank 2014-2017 and Chief Economist Colliers | United States 2010-2014 and author of North American Port, Industrial and Office Outlook reports 2012-2014. Conway was the 2007 recipient of the Appraisal Institute's President's Award; 2009 recipient of "Key Player" Award from the Atlanta Federal Reserve and the 2010 recipient of "Superior Contributions" Award by the FFIEC - Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council. He was CRE Risk Specialty Officer - NY FED during Financial Crisis 2009-2010 and briefed Federal Reserve's Board of Governors & Chairman Bernanke in June 2007 on the coming real estate crisis. Conway is a nationally recognized expert and speaker on a wide range of commercial real estate topics ranging from appraisal and bank regulation to ports and securitization. Areas of specialty include housing, industrial, litigation support, industrial and office real estate, North American ports and land development. He has been an expert witness in such prominent cases as the BCCI/First Atlanta Bank scandal and Crescent Resources bankruptcy and instructor and frequently requested speaker for the Federal Reserve, FDIC, FHLB, State bank commissioners, and numerous academic, professional organizations and industry associations, such as the Appraisal Institute, Counselors of Real Estate, ICSC, NAIOP, NAR, RMA, SIOR, ULI, University of Colorado, UF, Univ. of AL (ACRE) GA Tech, NYU, DePaul University, and University of CT.

William R. Emmons is an Assistant Vice President and Economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis. He conducts policy analysis and speaks frequently on topics including the economy, housing and mortgage markets, banking, financial markets, and financial regulation.

Dr. Emmons has been with the St. Louis Fed since 1995. He also serves as an Adjunct Professor of Finance in the John M. Olin Business School at Washington University in St. Louis. Prior to joining the St. Louis Fed and Washington University, he was on the faculty of the Amos Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College, in Hanover, New Hampshire.

Dr. Emmons received a PhD degree in Finance from the J. L. Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University. He received bachelor's and master's degrees from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
William R. Emmons, Ph.D

Collete English Dixon

Collete English Dixon has more than 30 years in investment management with a focus on commercial real estate investing. Prior to her current role at Roosevelt University, she was Executive Director - Transactions for PGIM Real Estate (formerly known as PREI), a business unit of Prudential Financial, and co-leader of PREI's national investment dispositions program. In that role, she oversaw the sale of more than 200 investment properties located throughout the US, with a total value of more than $8.7 Billion, on behalf of PREI's investment funds. Prior to her role in dispositions, English Dixon was responsible for sourcing more than $2.75B of wholly-owned and joint venture real estate investment opportunities in the Midwestern markets covering all property types, including office, multi-family, hotel, industrial and retail properties. Collete's experience also includes property development and asset management.

She is a Past President of CREW Network, a Past Chair of the CREW Network Foundation, a Past President of CREW Chicago, a full member of ULI and the 2016-2019 Chair of the UDMU Council/Purple. She is a member of the Board of Directors and Chair of the Investment Committee for the Housing Partnership Equity Trust, a member of the Board of Directors for BDREX and a member of its Audit and Governance committees, a board member of the Chicago Forum of the International Women's Forum, and a member of the Board of Directors of the Oak Park River Forest Food Pantry.


David C. Lennhoff, MAI, SRA, AI-GRS, is a senior director with Altus Group US, Inc., which is officed in McLean, Virginia. His practice centers on litigation valuation and expert testimony relating to appraisal methodology, USPAP and allocating assets of a going concern. He has taught nationally and internationally for the Appraisal Institute, recently in Tokyo, Japan; Beijing and Shanghai, China; Berlin, Germany; and Seoul, South Korea. He has been a development team member for most of the Institute's income capitalization courses and was editor of their Capitalization Theory and Techniques Study Guide (3rd ed.). He also was lead developer for the new asset allocation course, Fundamentals of Separating Real Property, Personal Property, and Intangible Business Assets, and editor of the two accompanying business enterprise value anthologies, and he authored the Institute's Small Hotel/Motel Valuation seminar. David is a member of RECGA, a national organization of analysts and academicians founded by the late William N. Kinnard, Jr. Ph.D. He is a past editor-in-chief of and frequent contributor to the Appraisal Journal.
David Lennhoff, MAI, SRA, AI-GRS

Angela Adoph, Esq.

Angie Adolph is a partner in the Baton Rouge office of Kean Miller. She joined the firm in 2011, and practices in the municipal finance and tax groups.

Angie has extensive experience in bond transactions, having served as bond counsel, underwriter's and disclosure counsel, issuer's counsel, trustee's and paying agent's counsel, and counsel in default proceedings. She has represented clients in the issuance of industrial development revenue bonds and has assisted non-profit organizations in connection with the issuance of qualified 501(c)(3) bonds. Angie represents Louisiana, national, and international clients in a variety of tax, business and corporate matters, including the negotiation of Cooperative Endeavor Agreements, Payments in Lieu of Taxes, and Public Private Partnerships. She is a member of the National Association of Bond Lawyers and is listed in the "Red Book" of bond professionals.



Brent Auberry is a Partner in the law firm of Faegre Baker Daniels LLP and concentrates his practice in state and local taxation. In more than a decade, he has represented property taxpayers across Indiana in real property tax assessment appeals and economic development/abatement matters involving office buildings, apartments, manufacturing facilities, and other commercial and industrial properties, as well as riverboat casinos. Brent has advised clients on personal property tax matters and counseled taxpayers on property tax exemptions and tax legislation. He has also represented taxpayers before the Indiana Department of Revenue and Tax Court on sales and use, income, gaming and other taxes.
Brent Auberry, Esq.

David Crapo, Esq.

David has extensive litigation experience and has tried hundreds of state and local tax matters before administrative tribunals and state and federal courts in Utah and numerous other states.

David is a frequent speaker on state and local tax issues and has presented at the annual Public Utilities workshop on Ad Valorem Taxation; the National Association of Property Tax Representatves, Transportation, Energy and Communications (NAPTR-TEC) Seminar; the American property Tax Counsel Seminar; and the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy; among others.



Morris Ellison's practice includes commercial real estate transactions, commercial litigation and banking law. He represents local, national and international investors, lenders, and real estate developers in the development, financing and disposition of commercial properties and other assets. Mr. Ellison has experience in a variety of complex real estate and business related issues including the development of several mixed-use projects, real property tax appeals, entity disputes and structuring and complex foreclosures and workouts.
Morris Ellison, Esq.

Phil Giannuario, Esq.
Philip J. Giannuario, Esq. is a partner with the law firm of Garippa, Lotz & Giannuario. He has specialized in ad valorem taxation for over 30 years and has handled some of the more complex commercial and industrial litigation cases in the country. Mr. Giannuario has authored and lectured on a number of topics concerning taxation. He has also been an instructor at Institute of Property Taxation schools.

Mr. Giannuario is a member of the New Jersey State Bar section on taxation. He has testified before the New Jersey State Legislature and has been quoted in leading magazines and papers, such as the Wall Street Journal.

Bob Gordon is a partner in the Tax Practice Group of Michael Best & Friedrich LLP. His practice includes federal, state and local taxation, tax controversies, trial and appellate litigation, property taxation of commercial, industrial, utility, and special use manufacturing properties, and property tax exemptions. He has successfully argued three landmark tax cases in the Wisconsin Supreme Court, Nankin v. Village of Shorewood, which upheld the constitutional right of all Wisconsin property owners to challenge their tax assessments in court; Metropolitan Associates v. City of Milwaukee, which held that legislation limiting taxpayer appeal rights enacted after the Nankin decision was also unconstitutional; and Deutsches Land, Inc. v. City of Glendale, which established the rules under which nonprofit organizations in Wisconsin can obtain property tax exemptions. He is a former Chair of the Taxation Section of the State Bar of Wisconsin, and he currently serves as Chair of the Best Practices Committee of American Property Tax Counsel.
Robert L. Gordon, Esq.

Lisa Stuckey, Esq.
Lisa received her B.A. in 1983 and her J.D. in 1986, both from Mercer University. After her graduation from law school, she clerked for two Superior Court Judges in Douglas County, Georgia. In 1987 Lisa went to work as staff attorney for DeKalb County, Georgia where for several years she represented the county in ad valorem tax disputes. She then went into private practice first with Dearing & Klauber then Jones, Morrison, Womack & Dearing before joining Ragsdale, Beals, Seigler, Patterson & Gray, LLP in 1999. Lisa is the Chair of the Firm's Ad Valorem Tax Practice and frequently writes and speaks both to lawyers and laymen on that topic.

Michele M. Whittington is a Member in the Lexington, Kentucky office of Morgan Pottinger & McGarvey, where her practice focuses on property taxation and administrative law. She has represented numerous local and national companies in challenging real property tax assessments, personal property tax assessments, and public service company assessments before the Kentucky Department of Revenue, the Kentucky Claims Commission, and various state trial and appellate courts in Kentucky. She has also assisted industry groups in drafting legislation and regulations on tax issues.

Michele is a frequent speaker on state and local tax issues, and has counseled various industry groups on relevant tax issues. She is a member of the Council on State Taxation and the Institute of Professionals in Taxation, and is an affiliate member of the International Association of Assessing Officers. Michele is listed in The Best Lawyers in America for Administrative/Regulatory Law.

Michele serves as a member of the Publications Committee for the Kentucky Bar Association. She currently serves as President of the Alumni Board for Transylvania University in Lexington, Kentucky.
Michele Whittington, Esq.
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Dec
30

Time for your Annual Property Tax Check

Question: What do the following have in common? A developer of a new mixed-use power center. The owner-operator of nursing homes or assisted living facilities. A national retailer with a large distribution center. A 100+ unit multifamily owner or manager. The owner of hotel chain. A high-tech manufacturer with a research and development facility. Answer: They all pay property taxes.

Whether you are a real estate investor or need real estate to house and facilitate your business operation, your real estate taxes will be one of your highest expenses, and one that you must pay even if your property is vacant or underperforming. Now is the time for your yearly check-up on your Ohio properties to determine whether the values that form the basis of your property taxes are fair.

Review your assessment

Start by reviewing the assessment on your tax bills. In Ohio, your tax valuation should reflect a reasonable sale price under typical market circumstances for the land and improvements as of the tax lien date of January 1, 2017. Verify that the information in the county records is accurate. For many Ohio counties, including Cuyahoga, much of this information will be online. Double-check building size, land size, year built, number of stories, etc.

Grounds for a change in value

The following are the most common types of evidence considered by boards of revision, which is the initial reviewing body:

Sale

One way to demonstrate value is with a recent, arm's length sale price. Generally, if a sale occurred within two years of tax lien date, did not include any non-real estate items, and was typically motivated, the price will be good evidence of the real estate value for tax purposes.

Appraisal

An appraisal can also be used to justify a change in value. Appraisal done for tax appeals must value the property as of the tax lien date. The appraiser should also be ready to testify at the hearing. Appraisals for tax appeals may have requirements that are not necessarily present for appraisals for other purposes, such as financing, so it is helpful to talk to someone familiar with the process.

Property Conditions

If there are unusual conditions, severe deferred maintenance, sudden changes in occupancy, or ongoing vacancy issues that affect the value of your real estate, that information should be brought to the attention of the board. Recent sales of properties similar to yours that support a lower value for your property may also help demonstrate that your valuation is incorrect.

Filing Deadline

The deadline to contest your assessment for properties in all Ohio counties is March 31. Because it falls on a Saturday in 2018, the deadline will be extended to April 2. The complaint form can be obtained from the county in which the property is located. The form is only one page; however, there are restrictions on who can file a complaint (i.e. what relationship they have to the property) as well as some technical requirements that may be missed by those unfamiliar with them. Generally, only one complaint can be filed per triennial period, although there are some exceptions.Once the deadline has passed for a particular tax year, the chance to contest that assessment is lost.

Procedure

After your complaint is filed, the local school district where the property is located has the opportunity to file a counter-complaint. After the period to file both complaints and counter-complaints has expired, the county board of revision will schedule a hearing. Each county board has its own rules regarding the submittal of evidence, requests for continuances, etc. At the board of revision hearing you will have the opportunity to explain why the assessment of your property is inaccurate. Boards of revision are not generally bound by the Ohio Rules of Evidence; boards are also empowered to conduct their own research. The board of revision may adopt the value you are seeking; it may make no change, or grant you are partial decrease. It may even increase the value, so it is important to consider carefully before filing a complaint.

Appealing the BOR decision

If you do not agree with the decision of the board of revision (BOR), you can appeal it to the county court of common pleas, or the Board of Tax Appeals (BTA) in Columbus. The BTA is an administrative tribunal that only hears tax related cases. Proceedings at this level are more formal than at the board of revision. Prior to September 29 of this year, a decision of the BTA could be directly appealed to the Ohio Supreme Court. Now any appeals from the Board of Tax Appeals and courts of appeals to the Ohio Supreme Court are discretionary and not as of right. The Supreme Court can decide not to hear your case. It is unclear yet the consequences of this recent legislative change, but there may be an increase in disparate treatment across the state as a result.

School district increase complaints

All Ohio taxpayers should be aware that Ohio is one of the few states (Pennsylvania is another) where school districts are enabled to file an action to get your tax valuation increased. Usually, this occurs when a recent purchase price is higher than the most recent tax assessment. Be aware of how the taxes will be prorated when you are working on a sale transaction. Depending on the timing of the sale, you may end up owing additional taxes for a period during which you did not actually own the property.

No one enjoys paying taxes, but with some research and preparation, you can make sure that your share of the real estate tax burden is fair.

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Dec
29

Great Big Box Win

In The Court Of Appeals Of The State Of Kansas In The Matter Of The Equalization Appeal Of Target Corporation, For The Year 2015 In Sedgwick County, Kansas.

Syllabus By The Court

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Dec
13

Cecilia J. Hyun, Promoted To Partner Of Siegel Jennings

Siegel Jennings is pleased to announce that Cecilia J. Hyun has been promoted to Partner. Ms. Hyun has been an associate at the firm for the past ten years and represents taxpayers in all aspects of the property tax challenge process from local review boards through the Ohio Supreme Court, reviews and monitors property tax assessments, and counsels investors on tax implications of acquisition and disposition.

Ms. Hyun is the 2017 President of CREW Cleveland, a chapter of CREW Network, an organization of approximately 10,000 commercial real estate professionals of all disciplines located in 70+ major markets in the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom. She previously served as CREW Cleveland's Director of Communications and as the chapter's CREW Network Liaison. In the last 5 years, she has been recognized as CREW Cleveland's Member of the Year, received the chapter's Leadership Award, named after founding member Deborah Rocker Klausner, as well as the Member to Member Business Award.

Her articles on property tax issues have been published in the Heartland Real Estate Business, Properties Magazine, Cleveland Metropolitan Bar Association Bar Journal, and the IPT Insider. Her article, "Big-box retail offers property tax lessons for industrial owners" published in the National Real Estate Investor is referenced in the IAAO Library Big-Box Retail Store Valuation Subject Guide.

Ms. Hyun, based in the firm's Cleveland office, received her B.A. from McGill University in Montreal, Canada, and her J.D., magna cum laude, from the Cleveland Marshall College of Law. 

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Nov
14

Oregon Law Offers Potential For Property Tax Reductions

Properties under construction and projects subject to governmental restriction can take advantage of legislative provisions the state provides.

The Portland metropolitan area is undergoing an unprecedented boom in commercial construction that extends from downtown to the suburbs and into just about every product type.Many taxpayers are preparing to pay larger tax bills, either because they are developing one of those new projects, or because they own properties that are becoming more valuable in response to growing demand for redevelopment sites. This is particularly common in developed areas where infill construction is hot.

Taxpayers in either of those positions may be missing out on significant tax savings if they are unaware of two provisions of Oregon law that could offer some respite. The Oregon legislative has carved out property tax provisions for a property under construction and for a property subject to a governmental restriction. The savvy property owner needs to know about these opportunities and comply with the statutory requirements to achieve the tax benefit.

The provisions are especially relevant to Portland's latest round of development, much of which is concentrated around infill in neighborhoods and on properties that were once used for industrial activities.

It is important to remember that Oregon law bases property taxes on the real market value of the property or the maximum assessed value under the Oregon Limits on Property Tax Rates Amendment of 1997. Also known as Measure 50, this amendment imposed restrictions on future increases in assessed values and on tax rates. Taxing entities multiply the assessed value by the tax rate to calculate the taxes owed.

The state defines "real market value" as the price an informed buyer would pay to an informed seller in an arms-length transaction. The statute goes on to state that if the property is subject to a governmental restriction as to use, "the property's real market value must reflect the effect of those restrictions."

That brings us to the tax-saving opportunities associated with usage restrictions and construction. Taxpayers typically think of government restrictions only as zoning law or a conditional land-use limitation. Often overlooked are environmental restrictions on a property's use, such as when the federal Environmental Protection Agency or the Department of Environmental Quality has identified the land as a contaminated site.

When a property is governed by a qualified environmental remediation plan, it is subject to a governmental restriction on the property's use. Obviously, the contamination and the future costs of remediation or containment significantly reduce the property's real market value.

One way to measure the reduction in market value caused by the government's environmental restrictions is to calculate the present value of the future clean-up costs. The assessing authority will consider the responsibility and costs of remediation or containment, and will usually reduce the real market value of the property significantly.

Another common governmental usage restriction occurs when a governmental agency provides low-interest loans or tax incentives as a means of encouraging development of certain types of public interest projects, such as low-income housing. The government loan will typically require that the property reserve a number of units for lease at a below-market rent.

In Oregon, the statute allows the property owner to choose whether it wants to enter into the special assessment program for low-income housing. A caution to the property owner that enters into the special assessment program for low-income housing is that the property could become subject to back taxes if it later fails to meet the requirements of the county, or of the loan.

Importantly, the statute does not require the property owner to enter the special assessment program to achieve the tax benefit of certain low-income housing units, as long as the loan meets certain statutory requirements and is properly recorded.

Not to be missed is the construction-in-progress exemption, which is available for income-producing properties. Most states encourage the development of commercial and industrial facilities by sheltering construction projects from the payment of taxation until the property is in use or occupied, and therefore generating rental income or enabling an owner-occupier to pursue business activities there.

The construction exemption requires strict compliance with the statute, and inadvertently failing to meet one of the criteria could cost the property owner a year of tax savings. The exemption isn't limited to manufacturing facilities; the Oregon Tax Court has held that this tax exemption is also available to a condominium under construction, provided that the units were held for sale until its completion.

While taxpayers in Portland's hot construction market enjoy many opportunities to take advantage of tax reductions, owners all across the state should be on the alert for these potential reductions.

Cynthia M. Fraser is a partner at the law firm Garvey Schubert Barer where she specializes in property tax and condemnation litigation. Ms. Fraser is the Oregon representative of American Property Tax Counsel, the national affiliation of property tax attorneys. Ms. Fraser can be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..
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Nov
14

Property Taxes Should Reflect Retail’s Apocalyptic Times

Instead, assessors continue to ignore the clear fact that brick-and-mortar retail is in massive decline.

The retail sector is experiencing its darkest period ever, and taxing entities must come to grips with declining shopping center values.

News reports confirm that national retailers are closing stores at a record pace. In 2017 alone, retail mainstays such as JC Penney, Sears and Macy's have shuttered hundreds of stores. Leading market analysts including Credit Suisse and Cushman & Wakefield have predicted the closing of some 10,000 brick-and-mortar stores.

Even worse, many national retailers are filing for bankruptcy protection, with several others on analysts' watch lists. The more than 300 retailers reported to have filed for bankruptcy protection in 2017 include several major brands, from Payless ShoeSource to Gymboree and Wet Seal. These dire conditions have spurred some economists to describe the ongoing blood-bath as a retail apocalypse.

Double Trouble

There are two main reasons for the retail sector's decline:

First, consumer preferences are migrating from shopping at brick-and-mortar stores to more online shopping. Online sales increased by about $40 billion in 2016 and accounted for nearly 42 percent of all retail sales growth that year. Amazon alone accounted for 53 percent of that growth, reportedly quintupling its North American sales to $80 billion in 2016 from $16 billion in 2010.

Second, today's consumers would rather spend their money on experiences than on material goods. They prefer dining out, going to movies and travel over buying more shoes, jeans, and electronics. And when they buy goods, they are increasingly likely to buy them online.

These ongoing changes in consumer behavior have resulted in a disturbingly high inventory of vacant retail space, made worse by years of over-building in the sector. The United States reportedly has 40 percent more retail space per person than Canada, five times more than the United Kingdom and 10 times more than Europe.

Shopping malls have been particularly affected. Once popular destinations, many regional malls now scramble to find quality tenants and to attract shoppers. To survive, some malls have taken desperate measures to steer customers to their stores, such as hosting amusement parks and concerts. Sadly, analysts predict 20 to 25 percent of U.S. shopping malls will close within the next five years. The market is simply oversaturated.

Value Questions

Consequently, retail property value has plummeted. What once was seen as a safe investment is now fraught with risk. Suffering national retailers have made retail real estate riskier as the chances of store closures and tenant bankruptcies have increased. Investors only value retail properties highly when those assets are generating a reliable stream of rental payments from high-quality tenants. But with department stores, electronics retailers and apparel shops boarding up, there is insufficient demand to sustain the rental rates and occupancy levels necessary for many properties to support historical values.

Unfortunately, tax assessors are turning a blind eye to this new reality, continuing to assume that there is a viable market with robust buyer demand for this property type.

In many jurisdictions, tax assessors have even raised taxable values on retail properties. This has obviously created confusion among property owners, as the values assessed by taxing jurisdictions conflict with selling prices that owners can garner on the open market.

When vacant properties go up for sale, they may linger on the market for years. And when they do sell, they are often sold to unconventional users, such as hospitals, trampoline parks, call centers, churches and schools. These buyers know that they can leverage the market oversupply to achieve low acquisition prices.

When owners point to sales of comparable — and often vacant — retail properties as evidence of market value, tax assessors accuse them of applying the "Dark Store Theory," which many assessors have mischaracterized as a tax loophole. Assessors have even convinced news media organizations of this misconception, evidenced by headlines such as "Sinister-Sounding Dark Store Theory Is Corporate Welfare and "How Big-Box Retailers Weaponize Old Stores."

This has fueled an ongoing debate concerning how to properly value the fee-simple interest in income-producing property, which in most jurisdictions is the taxable value.

In essence, tax assessors claim that retail property owners are trying to escape taxation by calculating taxable value based on the asking rents and sales of vacant retail locations, rather than on actual rents and sales of occupied properties. Tax assessors contend that property owners are comparing apples to oranges.

Property owners counter that assessors are overstating real estate value by capturing the additional value of non-taxable assets, such as long-term leases with brand-name retailers.

Despite this debate, there is no hiding the fact that retail is going dark. Shopping malls and oversized big box stores have become largely obsolete, bankruptcies and store closures plague the industry, and the glut of retail space grows. Preferences for on-line shopping and consumer purchasing patterns are here to stay.

We are reaching a point where the "dark store is the norm. The market has turned previous assumptions about variables such as market exposure, vacancy, capitalization rates and market rents on their heads, resulting in a retail meltdown.

Daniel R. Smith is a principal with and general counsel for Austin, Texas law firm Popp Hutcheson PLLC, the Texas member of American Property Tax Counsel, the national affiliation of property tax attorneys. James Johnson is a graduate student at Texas A&M University's Real Estate Center and tax analyst for Popp Hutcheson. They may be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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Sep
28

Where Has All The Value Gone In Retail?

Telltale signs can signal opportunities for tax reductions in declining retail properties.

For a number of years the mantra in the retail industry has been that retail property values and shopping center values, in particular, will continue to decline because consumers make purchases online rather than in brick-and-mortar stores. While this may be true, simply reciting the words to property tax authorities rarely succeeds in arguing for a reduced assessment.

The best strategy to obtain significant tax reductions for declining retail properties is an analysis of indicators that measure the mall's or shopping center's health. These factors come in four categories: anchor tenants, in-line tenants, tenant occupancy costs and prevailing lease agreements. While these dynamics may not be readily apparent, their analysis is the key to obtaining property tax relief.

Anchor Tenants

Mall anchor tenants have a significant say in how the property is configured, and in the mix of inline tenants. Consequently, when a national chain department store or other anchor tenant starts to experience a decline in sales per square foot, it can send tremors through the entire shopping center. Declining anchor tenant sales grow more serious when the anchor tenant's sales per square foot fall below the national chain-wide average. If the anchor consistently underper­forms the chain-wide average, the store is often deemed a candidate for closure.

Inline Tenants

Inline tenants are the bread and butter of most shopping centers. No other group receives more scrutiny than tenants occupying 10,000 square feet or less. The first thing mall evaluators look for is the types of inline tenants, as well as the trends in those tenant types. Landlords and investors prefer permanent inline tenants over temporary tenants. It is also better to have retail inline tenants than non-retail users, such as offices, government agencies and the like. Of course, the level of inline vacancy is also important because higher vacancy levels may trigger co-tenancy clauses in leases, thereby permitting tenants to vacate before their leases expire.

Tenant Occupancy Costs

The trend in tenants' cost of occu­pancy (COO) may be the best predictor of inline tenants' future performance. By extrapolating COO trends, it is also possible to project a mall's performance several years into the future.

The COO measures the ratio between gross sales and real estate ex­penses, including rent, maintenance charges and other costs that a tenant bears. The COO ratio for Class B and higher malls is usually in the 13 per­cent to 17 percent range, depending on the strength of the tenants, and between 10 percent and 12 percent for lower-end Class C malls.

COO ratios that are higher than these ranges indicate tenants are spending more of their gross revenues to pay property occupancy costs. This reduces the available revenues to pay other operating expenses and, obviously, limits the tenant's profits. Year-over­year increases in COO ratios means tenants are experiencing increasing financial pressure. Eventually, COO ratios become so high tenants will either ask for rent relief or other lease conces­sions, or just walk away.

Prevailing Lease Agreements

Most inline tenants enter into triple­net lease arrangements with the prop­erty owner when a shopping center first opens. Triple-net leases require tenants to pay for maintenance, insur­ance, real estate taxes and other property operating expenses, including the cost for operating common areas within the mall. As a mall declines, inline tenant sales per square foot dwindle, rental rates for new tenants decline and COO ratios increase. At some point, tenants will be unable to pay their rent and still make a profit. At this point, they are likely to ask the mall owner for some type of rent relief.

Rent relief for inline tenants takes different forms, but usually consists of converting triple-net leases to leases paying a percentage of sales, or some­times to gross leases, both of which make the mall owner bear more operating costs. An increase in the number of percentage and gross leases shows that inline tenants are unable to generate enough sales to pay rent and other occupancy expenses.

As more and more leases become percentage or gross leases, the expense burden on the mall owner increases, and the likelihood grows that the mall will close. During this time, the mall owner may replace departing inline tenants with new tenants that demand gross lease arrangements, which further contribute to the mall's decline.

Seek Early Property Tax Relief

The four factors discussed above are interrelated. The progression of falling dominoes starts when the anchor tenant's sales begin to decline. This then leads to a fall in the number of permanent inline retailers, a rise in COO ratios, and the replacement of preferred triple-net leases with percentage or gross leases. All these factors put downward pressure on a retail property's value, which typically reduces the property's tax assessment.

Most of this sequence cannot be observed because it happens below the surface, but it may be the precursor to a mall's failure. Thus, the local property tax authority may not realize a mall is in decline until it falls off the cliff, as when an anchor tenant closes its doors or high-end retailers fail to renew their leases and move to other malls.

Astute retail property owners and operators will identify the underlying problems in a mall or shopping center early on, and bring those difficulties to the attention of the local tax assessor. Doing so may reduce taxes - and mall operating expenses - well before a property is in free-fall mode. If the tax relief is significant and obtained early in the process, it may even extend the life of the mall.

Cris K. O'Neall is a shareholder at the law firm Greenberg Traurig, LLP and focuses his practice on ad valorem property tax assessment counseling and litigation. The firm is the California member of the American Property Tax Counsel, the national affiliation of property tax attorneys. He can be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..
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Sep
25

Louisiana: Tax Exemption For Partially Completed Construction?

Passage of a new ballot initiative will confirm exemption of partially completed property from taxation."

Any taxpayer planning to develop a new property must consider how local taxing entities will treat the project during construction, but the question is especially important in evaluating and comparing overall costs of potential development locations during an industrial site search.

States generally recognize Construction Work in Progress (CWIP) as property that is in the process of changing from one state to another, such as the conversion of machinery, construction materials and other personal property from inventory into an asset or fixture by installation, assembly or construction. There is no clear consensus among taxing jurisdictions as to whether (or how) a tax assessor should value such par­tially completed construction on the applicable assessment date.

Many states including Alabama, Missouri and North Carolina value CWIP based on the value or percentage of completion on the assessment date. Kansas values incomplete construction based on the cost incurred as of the assessment date. Florida, Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia assess CWIP when the work has progressed to a degree that it is useful for its eventual purpose. And in South Carolina, improvements are only assessed upon completion.

With the exception of a few errant assessments in the early 1930s, Louisiana has never assessed partially completed construction for property tax purposes. Rather, taxing jurisdictions assess and add the completed property to tax rolls as of January 1 of the year immediately following completion of construction. This complements Louisiana's industrial tax exemption program, which exempts certain manufacturing property from ad valorem taxation for a specified number of years.

Unfortunately, properties on which ad valorem taxes have been paid are ineligible for participation in the exemption program. Thus, if a taxpayer has paid taxes on a project as partially completed construction, the property is no longer eligible for the industrial tax exemption and remains on the taxable rolls, subject to assessment each year. Obviously, assessing projects with partially finished construction in this manner would significantly diminish the value of the exemption pro­gram to taxpayers and undermine its usefulness to economic develop­ment agencies as an incentive tool.

In 2016, a local assessor broke with established practice and initiated an audit that included construction work in progress on a major industrial taxpayer. This audit raised statewide and local uniformity concerns over the assessment of a single taxpayer's partially completed construction in a single parish, and jeopardized the taxpayer's existing industrial tax exemption.

The taxpayer immediately filed an injunction action in district court, and the Louisiana Legislature took up the situation during its regular 2017 legislative session. Recognizing the need to formalize the exemption, the Legislature referred to voters a constitutional amendment that would codify the exemption of construction work in progress from assessment. Louisiana is one of 16 states that require a two-thirds supermajority in each chamber of the Legislature to refer a constitutional amendment to the ballot, so their vote underscores the strong support among lawmakers to codify the exemption.

Act 428 would add a subsection to Article VII, Section 21 of the Louisiana Constitution, which lists property that is exempt from ad valorem tax assessment. The new provision would exempt from ad valorem tax all property delivered to a construction project site for the purpose of incorporating the property into any tract of land, building or other construction as a component part. This exemption would apply until the construction project is completed (i.e. occupied and used for its in­tended purpose).

The exemption would not apply to (1) any portion of a construction project that is complete, available for its intended use, or operational on the date that property is assessed; (2) for projects constructed in two or more distinct phases, any phase of the construction project that is complete, available for its intended use or operational on the date the property is assessed; (3) certain public service property.

If voters approve the ballot item, CWIP will be exempt from property taxes until construction is "completed." The proposed amendment defines a completed construction as occurring when the property "can be used or occupied for its intended purpose." The exemption would thus remain effective until the construction project or given construc­tion phases of the project are ready to be used or occupied.

A constitutional amendment does not require action by the Governor. This constitutional amendment will be placed on the ballot at the state­wide election to be held on Oct. 14, 2017.

Angela Adolph is a partner in the law firm of Kean Miller LLP, the Louisiana member of American Property Tax Counsel, the national affiliation of property tax attorneys. She can be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..
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Sep
18

Jeffrey A. Brown and Thomas E. Sweeney Among Top Ten Property Tax Lawyers

Leading Lawyers℠ names Jeffrey A. Brown and Thomas E. Sweeney among top ten property tax lawyers.

Leading Lawyers℠ Top 10 Layers

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Sep
11

Misnaming, Misusing The Dark Store Theory

What's in a name? Discussing valuation principles with concise language avoids misunderstanding.

Dark store theory is being used incorrectly to name what is standard, accepted, and proper appraisal practice. It is most often employed by news media to mistakenly suggest that big-box storeowners are taking advantage of a property tax loophole and arguing that a property should be valued as if it were vacant even when the store is open and operating.

While the words "dark store" evoke images of villainous or nefarious activity, assessors and taxpayers should see through this provocative language.

The phrase often confuses the fee simple (absolute ownership of the real estate subject only to governmental powers) market value of the real es­tate with other types of quantifiable value, such as investment or insurable value.

Investment value reflects value to a specific investor based on his own in­vestment requirements, while insur­able value reflects improvements or the portion of the property that may be destroyed.

Typically, property taxes should only be assessed on the real estate value. That's why it's important to differentiate property value for real estate tax assessment from other types of value.

What local law deems real estate value often is different from the property's value to a lender or investor. For example, an owner may include large manufacturing equipment as part of collateral for a mortgage.

This equipment may be valued along with the real estate in determin­ing a loan amount, and may even be included in a financing appraisal; yet the value of that equipment should not be taxed as real estate.

Although this careless and unsys­tematic misapplication of dark store theory concerns commercial real es­tate, we will use examples of single­family homes to illustrate its con­cepts.

Comparable sales valuation

In many jurisdictions, assessors value the land, building and improve­ments for real estate tax purposes. If using sales of comparable proper­ties to determine value, the assessor should examine exactly how much was paid, by whom, for what.

If the sale price of the compara­ble property includes value for an above-market lease, for unusually favorable financing terms, or for an above-average credit rated tenant, the assessor must adjust the sale price to reflect market conditions. The flip side is also true: a sales price based on below-market rent should also be adjusted.

Users of the "dark store theory" label often argue that a busy store deserves a higher real estate tax as­sessment because a large and sophis­ticated company is running a suc­cessful business there. But excluding business value from the real estate as­sessment doesn't mean that the prop­erty owner made ill-advised business decisions.

The adjustments recognize that the sale included additional sources of value or achieved valuable business objectives in addition to the exchange of real estate. The value of these items is separate, and must be excluded from the real estate value for tax pur­poses.

Consider this residential example: a buyer pays 20 percent more than the high end of the market range to buy the house next door to the buyer's brother. The two families have chil­dren of similar ages and expect to save money by carpooling and shar­ing child care and other expenses.

The buyer is acting in his own self­interest and values the proximity to the brother's household, and the ob­jectives the buyer will meet by living next door. That does not mean that the additional money the buyer paid for those considerations increases the value of the house itself to the typical buyer.

lf an appraiser uses this purchase price as a comparable sale to value a similar house across the street, the purchase price should be adjusted to reflect a more typical market partici­pant.

Similarly, any sales of comparable properties used to value big-box retail stores must be adjusted to exclude any value paid for items that are not real estate, whether they are an above­market-quality tenant, atypically long lease duration or other intangible property.

Income approach valuation

Two distinct and important issues get muddied by dark store adherents in valuations based on potential in­come generation.

The first is whether the properties are valued as if vacant, or as if occu­pied at market terms. Valuation as if occupied at market terms by a typi­cal market tenant does not include a landlord's lease-up time and costs, which are factors in the value of a va­cant property.

Secondly, there will generally be a correlation between better retail properties in better locations and the financial strength of the tenants in those properties and areas. Howev­er, the business success or failure of a specific tenant cannot be the basis of a real estate tax assessment if that tenant is not representative of the market.

Returning to the single-family world, houses in desirable areas with good schools, municipal servic­es and low crime rates are generally occupied by people with higher in­comes than homes in less-desirable areas.

However, that does not mean that the income of a specific resident deter­mines the value of the house that he or she occupies. If a brain surgeon and a retail cashier are next-door neighbors in similar houses, the values of the homes do not change.

If two similar retail stores are located in a similar area, but one is gener­ating extremely high store sales while the other is vacant because of a business decision to exit the local market, the value of the properties for real es­tate tax purposes should be the same.

Valuing property is always fact intensive, and the array of specifics dif­fers from situation to situation. There are no shortcuts to an accurate and fair tax assessment value. If the data used is bad and valuation process sloppy, the value conclusion will also be wrong. Consistent and rigorous analysis is vital.

Don't be fooled by labels

Proper appraisal methodology does not become nefarious just because it is erroneously called a "dark store loop­hole." A rose by another name would smell as sweet. Taxpayers need to pay attention when the term "dark store" is bandied about - it is often used to confuse important appraisal concepts and practices.

To be fair and uniform, property taxes must be assessed only against the real estate, and be based on accurate data reflecting typical market participants. Value related to the success of the retailer's business is captured by other taxes levied on income, sales or commercial activity.

To include those items as part of the property tax assessment is not closing a tax loophole; it amounts to double taxation.

Ignore incendiary language and apply appraisal methodology consistently and diligently to arrive at a fair value for real estate taxes.

Cecilia Hyun is an attorney at the law firm Siegel Jennings Co, L.P.A., which has offices in Cleveland and Pittsburgh. The firm is the Ohio and Western Pennsylvania member of American Property Tax Counsel. She can be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..
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