Menu

Property Tax Resources

3 minutes reading time (568 words)

Three Questions Buyers Should Ask, About Utah Property Taxes

In Utah, only real and personal tangible properties are subject to property tax. Intangible property is exempt from Utah property tax. This includes such things as licenses, contracts, trade names custom software, trained workforce, copyrights and goodwill. If a property owner acquired any of these intangible properties along with the real estate, then there is an opportunity to reduce the property tax obligation for the real estate and other personal property. The key is to identify and separate the portion of the total purchase price that is associated with the intangible properties.

What is the standard of value for property tax?

Utah is a fair market value standard state. In simple terms, fair market value is the price a typical, willing buyer would pay a typical, willing seller for a property, with both parties being knowledgeable of all relevant facts. Accordingly, investment value or the price a specific buyer paid to acquire a property for a particular use may not indicate the fair market value. The price may need to be adjusted if the owner is trying to use it as evidence of the taxable property value.

What are the reporting requirements?

Generally, property owners will not have a reporting requirement for locally assessed land and buildings. Utah is a non-disclosure state, which means a buyer isn't required to disclose to the county assessor the price paid for real estate.
However, a buyer will likely receive a questionnaire from the assessor requesting voluntary disclosure of the purchase price, as well as access to the property to conduct an appraisal.

After reviewing the real estate, the assessor will issue an assessment that estimates what the property's fair market value was on Jan. 1. The county assessor is required to send notices indicating the property's fair market value and the associated tax by July 22. Appeals are due by Sept. 15, and taxes are due by Nov.

30. Utah does require reporting' of any business personal property. Each year, owners must submit a self-assessment of personal property tax liability, identifying 'the personal property, its cost and date of acquisition. Then the owner must apply a percent good factor to the property based upon the age and type of property in order to estimate the fair market value for the property. The tax commission is required to update and publish the percent good factors each year.

Apply the tax rate to the estimated fair market value to determine the amount of personal property tax due. Generally, signed personal property statements will be due to the county assessor by May 15. Appeals on personal property taxes are also due by May 15, or within 60 days after the mailing of a tax notice. While this brief discussion is certainly not a thorough review of Utah property taxes, it does cover the three basic things an investor should know when making a decision to acquire property in Utah.

dcrapo David J. Crapo is the managing partner at Crapo Smith PLLC, Utah Member of American Property Tax Counsel. He can be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Scandal Fallout Threatens Los Angeles Property Tax...
Potential Tax Increase Threatens Georgia Property ...

American Property Tax Counsel

Recent Published Property Tax Articles

COVID-19 Update

Washington state was hit early and hard by the COVID-19 pandemic.The effects on the economy, and the implications for property values, are enormous. State and local government officials have imposed a series of restrictions with the latest being Governor Inslee's March 23 "stay at home" order that closes all nonessential...

Read more

Property Tax Planning Delivers Big Savings

Ask the right questions, understand your rights and develop a strategy to avoid costly mistakes.

When it comes to property taxes, what you don't know can hurt you. Whether it is failing to meet a valuation protest deadline, ignorance of available exemptions or perhaps missing an error in the assessment records...

Read more

Achieving Fair Taxation Of Big Box Retrofits

Issues to address to ensure a big box retrofit doesn't sustain an excessive tax assessment.

As more and more large retail spaces return to the market for sale or lease, creative investors are looking for ways to breathe new life into the big box. These retrofits saddle local tax appraisal districts...

Read more

Member Spotlight

Members

Forgot your password? / Forgot your username?